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A Conversation w/ Dj DDT

DESMOND “DJ DDT” TRAVIS
As a music producer, DJ and audio mixer engineer Desmond “DJ DDT” Travis got his start in the industry at the tender age of nine. The mastermind behind local hits, such as Simple Night Groove and Nighttime Escape DDT has earned a name for himself not only as a DJ, but as a photographer as well. In an exclusive interview with The College of Hip Hop he opened up about How he got his star in the industry and offers advice to those looking to purse a similar path.

TCOHH: Could you introduce yourself to The College Of Hip Hop's audience.
DJ DDT: My name is Desmond "DJ DDT" Travis

TCOHH: What initially attracted you to the entertainment industry?
DJ DDT: That's kind of a hard question to answer, but I'd have to say seeing my older brothers playing in bands when I was a very young kid. Also, reading the credits on the back of album covers and the end credits at the end of movies.

TCOHH: What are your thoughts on the current state of the entertainment industry?
DJ DDT: The entertainment industry is not in a completely bad sate, but we're in a state where we don't physically own anything. It's all virtual: the music is streamed to us. The movies and shows are streamed to us. We don't own vinyl, CDs, cassettes, DVDs or reel film...let alone digital files on our electronic storage devices. To me, that says a lot.

TCOHH: What is your ideal of success and why?
DJ DDT: Success is loving and enjoying where you are in your life. I think that way because enjoying life should be more important than obtaining materials, looking for them to improve how you feel.

TCOHH: What advice would you give a young executive looking to enter into the entertainment industry?
DJ DDT: I'd tell anyone looking to get into the entertainment industry to do extensive research and know exactly what you're stepping into. Also, prepare to lose tons of sleep and to be stressed beyond measure. Also, learn how to be a dick...and when to use the knowledge of being a dick.

TCOHH: How do you feel under education or miss education has hurt artist with in urban music?
DJ DDT: Undereducation and miseducation can hurt you in a number of ways. Moreover, it can have you wide open to being taken advantage of. Know that being educated doesn't mean 4 years at an Ivy League institution, though. You can learn so much just by reading books and watching YouTube.

TCOHH: How do you feel hip hop culture has impacted the world on a positive and negative level?
DJ DDT: Hip Hop has positively affected the world in so many ways. We've shown the world our views from the ghetto, before the internet. We've shown the world how to use, first, the English language and other spoken languages of the world, in bold, new ways. We've set trends in fashion, attitudes, thought processes, etc... Negatively, we've shown the world lots of ignorant ways. I don't want to expound on them because I want to be one to uplift our people and, in turn, uplift others.

TCOHH: How has the Detroit rap market changed over the years?
DJ DDT: The Detroit rap community has changed by melding with the rest of the Hip-Hop community in The States. The internet has brought our worlds so much closer together.